Donate to PSCW through Birdies for Charity!

PSCW is participating in Birdies for Charity! Please consider donating to help us provide monthly educational forums to the public, test the water quality of 60 sites in Scott County, and provide technical assistance to citizens looking to improve their water management practices! Our charity number is 2299, and you can donate here: https://birdiesforcharity.com/donate https://birdiesforcharity.com/files/pdf/Chipin_2020web_Fillable_Address_page1.pdf

GoFundMe Campaign

We are searching for funds to continue running our Snapshot volunteer water quality monitoring events to their full potential! This includes purchasing enough materials for 10-15 monitoring kits and costs for lab analysis. We appreciate your support! https://www.gofundme.com/f/water-quality-monitoring

Spring Snapshot Canceled

The PSCW Board has decided to cancel the Spring Snapshot volunteer water quality monitoring event, in the likelihood that CDC social distancing recommendations will be extended past April 30. The summer Snapshot is scheduled for Saturday, July 18 from 8-12 at the Eldridge Community Center. Stay tuned to PSCW’s website, social media, and email list

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April 2020 Forum

Tuesday, April 21 12:00-1:00pm *Note: To keep in consideration of social distancing recommendations, the April forum will be held virtually via Zoom. See below for more information about registering and viewing the forum. Dr. Keith Schilling is the State Geologist of Iowa and Director of the Iowa Geological Survey at the University of Iowa. Dr,

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Water Quality Lessons at Home!

Water Rocks! has launched The Monday Mix, a new multimedia e-newsletter providing conservation and water quality education materials and activities for school-age youth who are suddenly “learning from home.” Click here to learn more.

#FridaysOnTheFarm

Check out this amazing water quality improvement story! The Fletcher Gulch Watershed consists of 6,500 acres. The lower half of the watershed is irrigated cropland, and the upper half is rangeland. The drainage enters the Old Owyhee Ditch, a tributary to the Owyhee and Snake rivers. “We knew we had a problem with water quality,

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